MotoGP

FTR London

Active member
So HRC bought the 2022 RCV to Portimao. Marc's injury has highlighted how far behind this motorcycle has become during his domination. They've rolled out a completely new bike. Main change appears to be that the engine is mounted further back towards the swing arm pivot to increase traction. Front end, completely redesigned, but I wonder whether some of the strength under hard braking which has suited Márquez so much may now be compromised.
 

FTR London

Active member
Congratulations to Acosta, but it had to be Binder that took out Foggia. :mad:

Great to see Miller back on the podium. If Pecco hadn't crashed out at Misano, this would have gone to down to Valencia!

Really respect Remy opting for the hard rear knowing that his teammate had 7/10ths on the soft. It takes a measured and confident racer to cede grip in the early laps to a championship rival despite knowing what he could do on the hard option. How Fernandez hung on to that tyre is beyond me - particularly watching Bezzechhi going backwards. One more lap and Lowes would have been on his rear wheel. Twenty three point lead for Remy - one race to go. Valencia's a horrible circuit to go to though.

Shout out to Cam Beaubier who looked great today at, like Texas, a circuit he knows.
 

edgelett

Well-known member
brilliant ride by Remy. missed moto 3.
moto gp wasn't the most exciting race apart from the Miller/Marquez battle but great to see Pecco back on form.
one left to go!
 

FTR London

Active member
Lets enjoy Vale´s last race weekend (y)(y)
I gain no satisfaction whatsoever from watching him aimlessly circulate at the back of the field and deprive an upcomer of a ride in the process. It's like a once legendary band or musician on these nostalgia trips that believe their own hype and have become an anachronism, a parody of themselves refusing to step out of the spotlight and accept that they are no longer artistically relevant. I will however certainly enjoy the fact it's his last race weekend and that many of those that are fans of the 46 brand as opposed to the sport of motorcycle racing will be heading in the same outward direction.
 

Helge

Active member
I gain no satisfaction whatsoever from watching him aimlessly circulate at the back of the field and deprive an upcomer of a ride in the process. It's like a once legendary band or musician on these nostalgia trips that believe their own hype and have become an anachronism, a parody of themselves refusing to step out of the spotlight and accept that they are no longer artistically relevant. I will however certainly enjoy the fact it's his last race weekend and that many of those that are fans of the 46 brand as opposed to the sport of motorcycle racing will be heading in the same outward direction.

Yawn... Your repetitive aversion to VR46 becomes boring... it is already accepted ✌️
 

FTR London

Active member
Yawn... Your repetitive aversion to VR46 becomes boring... it is already accepted ✌️
Not looking for acceptance at all - nor antagonistic. Trust me, to those neutral fans of the sport, the idolisation, mythology and constant unrelenting "GOAT" nonsense over the last quarter of a century is infinitely more irritating. Glad to see the back of him and his deranged cult following.
 
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FTR London

Active member
Congratulations to Remy - so pleased to see this. I've been nervous all week in the run up for this. Despite his Father, it's been by no means an easy ride. He's done this the hard way. Thrilled for him.

I can't see Fernandez winning a title on the KTM but I can see HRC poaching him and multiple world championships in the future. This lad is the real deal.

Great to see the Zooks up at the sharp end again - although doesn't that just sum up Rins' season this year? That's a rookie mistake I'm afraid.
Complete Ducati domination - haven't laughed so much since Bayliss won here on his wild card ride in 2006.Really fancy Martin as a title contender next season.

So I guess it's only right to mention it. Final race today. Years of entertainment, one of the most amiable riders to ever grace the sport, but pleased to say that he, along with his influence will still remain in the paddock if not the track. Thank you for the memories and we wish you well in your retirement Thomas Luthi.

Seriously though. Without question the nicest, most likeable and noble Italian rider of all time. It simply won't be the same without him. But I'm sure there isn't any genuine fan of this sport that won't be rooting for Danilo Petrucci in next year's Dakar.

Great to see Mauro Noccioli highlighted this weekend.








Oh and...cheers Vale. Might compile a top ten of my favourite races.
 

edgelett

Well-known member
Main race was on way past my bedtime so watched it last night.
Great to see the 3 Ducs on the podium, both Pecco and Jack are going to be serious title contenders next year. Having both Repsol Hondas missing may have contributed to that, who knows.
Rumour has it that Marquez's injury is a lot more serious than Honda have let on - the double vision is worrying. I do hope he is able to continue to race in 2022.
Will miss Petrucci in the paddock, he's such a likeable guy.
Great tribute to Valentino, was awesome seeing all his VR46 academy riders wearing some of his most iconic helmets for the race. As he will have teams in all 3 categories next year, he'll still be around just in a different capacity.

Given the strong reactions his existence seems to generate in this thread, I wanted to share something I've never spoken about on this page.

In 2007, my dad had a major heart attack. Technically, he was dead for 20 mins with only CPR keeping his heart beating and oxygen in his body. In fact if it wasn't for the quick actions of the person who's house he was at (he was putting an alarm in a guy's car) in doing CPR he would have been gone forever.
Dad was in a coma for 4 days. When he woke up, his brain was rooted. He could talk, but he had no idea of his name, his age, where he lived, didn't recognise family etc.
We were told that we should expect our dad was gone and this new person who didn't recognise himself or us would be living with a carer for the rest of his life. My sister, brother and I were grieving because we believed our dad was gone and we would never have him back with us again.but we were also told to try to help him by bringing in things from home, playing familiar music, and visiting and talking frequently. You could see in his face he recognised our faces but couldn't work out how he knew us.

My brother had brought in some of dad's go kart trophies from his shed. I was visiting one day and chatting to him and he asked 'what are all these trophies for?' I said 'they're yours. You won them in go karting'. He said 'I race go karts? that's cool!' I said 'yes dad you do, your race number is 46.' He said '46? that's the same as Valentino Rossi!'

At that moment - I knew that my dad was still in there, I knew we should not give up and we had to help him fight. He had his memories, they were just all jumbled up and mixed around like a filing cabinet that had been knocked over, and we had to help him put them in order again. And slowly but surely, he started doing other things that were familiar too - he called my nephew 'little dude' which was the nickname he had given him (couldn't remember his name was Eli though), he remembered he was from New Zealand (he was convinced he was at the airport waiting for his flight to Australia), and he wanted to watch the '500cc world championship' because (in his words) 'Valentino Rossi is the 250 world champion, I recon he could win the 500's one day'.

It was a long hard road - Dad's heart attack was 7 December 2007 and after 3 months in hospital he moved to a rehab centre for another 3 months before he was able to come home. If you were to talk to him today, you'd have no idea of how messed up his brain was - you'd just go 'his short term memory is a bit shit'. But that one comment from him where he recognised that 46 was Rossi's number was what gave me hope that one day he might be ok.

I wish Valentino a great retirement.
 

kiwi dave

Active member
In 2007, my dad had a major heart attack. Technically, he was dead for 20 mins with only CPR keeping his heart beating and oxygen in his body. In fact if it wasn't for the quick actions of the person who's house he was at (he was putting an alarm in a guy's car) in doing CPR he would have been gone forever.
Dad was in a coma for 4 days. When he woke up, his brain was rooted. He could talk, but he had no idea of his name, his age, where he lived, didn't recognise family etc.
We were told that we should expect our dad was gone and this new person who didn't recognise himself or us would be living with a carer for the rest of his life. My sister, brother and I were grieving because we believed our dad was gone and we would never have him back with us again.but we were also told to try to help him by bringing in things from home, playing familiar music, and visiting and talking frequently. You could see in his face he recognised our faces but couldn't work out how he knew us.

My brother had brought in some of dad's go kart trophies from his shed. I was visiting one day and chatting to him and he asked 'what are all these trophies for?' I said 'they're yours. You won them in go karting'. He said 'I race go karts? that's cool!' I said 'yes dad you do, your race number is 46.' He said '46? that's the same as Valentino Rossi!

At that moment - I knew that my dad was still in there, I knew we should not give up and we had to help him fight. He had his memories, they were just all jumbled up and mixed around like a filing cabinet that had been knocked over, and we had to help him put them in order again. And slowly but surely, he started doing other things that were familiar too - he called my nephew 'little dude' which was the nickname he had given him (couldn't remember his name was Eli though), he remembered he was from New Zealand (he was convinced he was at the airport waiting for his flight to Australia), and he wanted to watch the '500cc world championship' because (in his words) 'Valentino Rossi is the 250 world champion, I recon he could win the 500's one day'.

It was a long hard road - Dad's heart attack was 7 December 2007 and after 3 months in hospital he moved to a rehab centre for another 3 months before he was able to come home. If you were to talk to him today, you'd have no idea of how messed up his brain was - you'd just go 'his short term memory is a bit shit'. But that one comment from him where he recognised that 46 was Rossi's number was what gave me hope that one day he might be ok.

Edgelett, that's a touching story. Although I have never had a heart attack (yet), I did a face plant on my electric bicycle about eight months ago. I don't remember getting home, and I hid in the dark until my nurse wife Raewyn came home. She took me to Accident & Emergency, who in turn sent us to a hospital the other side of Auckland to get a brain scan. After the scan, which determined I was "OK", they repaired my eyebrow with glue.

Although my long term memory is fine, I still have moments that I just can't remember what I did a couple of hours ago. I find myself in situations that I have difficulty understanding, petty little things, and frustrated that I should know but can't remember for the moment. I am getting better, but there's still those moments .....

I only hope the NZ Transport authorities don't frequent these forums, otherwise I might find myself without a driver's licence.

Eye injury CU.jpg
 
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edgelett

Well-known member
yikes. yeah the brain can get knocked around pretty easy unfortunately.
dad recovered a lot more than Dr's expected and we're glad he's with us. we have had to make a LOT of adjustments to our lives to accomodate his short term memory issues.
He could name you every motorcycle he ever owned. But he has already lost the $50 I gave him for his birthday on the weekend.
He has driving tests every 2 years, he always passes cause it's something he's done for years. but teaching him how to use his Go Pro is hell lol
 

FTR London

Active member
Rossi wants the NSR500 which I think HRC should allow. Unfortunately Japanese marques do not forget and Honda in particular have a long memory...
100375_rossi-celebration-in-brno-2-1280x960-aug27.jpg..middle.jpg

It's likely even if he did get it that it would be in an emasculated form (ironically with most of the comparative advantage long since stripped away). Stoner has his championship winning RCV213-s machine on a lifetime loan with many of the internals removed.

I always recall Steve Parrish's immortal comment to Barry Sheene when still contracted to Suzuki he elected to don a Yamaha t.shirt for the annual MCN awards ceremony..."that'll be the most expensive shirt you'll ever wear".
 
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